Our First Professional Independent Review for “The Lost Polymath” The Mystery Hunters Series, Book One: Continents

The Lost Polymath

A MUST-READ & 5 STARS!!!!!

“The Lost Polymath” written by Kurtis and Ramona Palmer is the first book in the Mystery Hunters Series. Meant for children ages 8 to 13, this book is sure to ignite the interest of children who loves to solve one mystery after another. This is not the usual reference book that will teach you straightaway subjects like mathematics, science, or geography. It is an interactive book that will invite the reader to be a part of the story and to solve the mystery about Professor Septenary. By writing their names within the book itself, the reader will take part in trying to find out about the lost professor, teaming up with mystery hunters Sarah and Christian. They can even draw a picture of themselves on pages reserved for our young detectives.

Aside from being included in the story, the reader will also have the chance to answer several questions within each chapter of the book. In this way, reading becomes even more fun and exciting! By not giving information directly, the reader is urged to research for the answer needed, and this method allows them to recall important facts more effectively. In some instances, they may already know the exact answer to some questions, and being able to write them down right away becomes even a more satisfying activity. It’s not quite often that I find a unique combination of information, mystery, and fun in a book. “The Lost Polymath” is definitely a good read, especially for very inquisitive kids. I know that my nephew is one and I could almost see him excitedly trying to put together the various clues in the story. I just love a good mystery, especially if it’s a book that could also take me to beautiful places around the world.

Though I’m already a grownup, I must admit that I have learned much from this story. I even did my research to find out several facts I didn’t know before about the places mentioned in the book. On top of all that, the book also has a bonus titled “The Mystery of the Missing Milk”, a prequel to the series. I can’t wait to read it, too. This is a very well written and researched book that will captivate the interest of inquisitive readers, rewarding them with knowledge and a sense of adventure they truly deserve.

Professional & Independent Reviewer, Jocelyn Soriano, Reedsy International

Our First Professional Review!

“Numbers from Heaven” Mathematics: Book One

We are excited about receiving 5 Stars & 2 Thumbs Up!

Reviewed by Jocelyn Soriano

Editorial Reviews

“Numbers from Heaven” by Kurtis C. R. Palmer & Ramona Palmer is the first picture book in the “Womb to BLOOM to Classroom” series. It has vividly beautiful 3D illustrations that almost leap out of the book’s pages, quickly capturing the interest of young ones. From the very first pages, they’d want to follow Zoey Zebra and P.B., the panda bear, learning and even enhancing the power of their imagination. This book opens to children a whole new world that’s not only educational but also fun and worth their time. Parents and their kids can spend precious bonding moments while learning to count and even recognize some colors. The story itself takes the child to simple exercises in counting, allowing the young one to master the number being taught. Zoey’s story also contains some mystery that kids can look forward to. As she discovers the treasure chest left by her Grandpa, who knows what wonders await her and her friend as they try to unlock the secret behind each key that they possess? Being the first book in a whole series that promises to teach various subjects, parents and children can definitely look forward to new adventures with Zoey and her friends. I was so happy when the book even presented a bonus animated reading of the story for those who subscribe to their Newsletter. I watched it right away and I couldn’t wait to watch for more. I’m certain my nephews would enjoy both the book and the animation as they get to know Zoey and her set of friends. Two thumbs up and five stars for this educational and fun-filled book! REVIEWED BY Jocelyn Soriano

The Lost Polymath

Chapter One

The Mysteries of the Number Seven

First Chapter: 50 Words

Sarah and Christian both dream mysterious dreams. These dreams transport them around the corner, around the globe, and through the universe and back. They’re first cousins and best friends who plan mystery hunts every summer.

Christian’s and Sarah’s grandmother, Tata, had this same gift of prophetic dreams. She called them waking dreams because she dreamt of echoes from the future and then, suddenly, woke up.

She instructed her grandchildren to be cautious of the invisible force that would try to disrupt or stop their quests. She warned them, “This invisible force will try to frighten you, change your circumstances, alter your path, and place obstacles in your way. You were given a special gift. Use it wisely.”

Sarah and Christian were the same age. Christian resembled his dad and his Uncle Virgil, Sarah’s dad. He had dark wavy hair, deep blue-green eyes, and on most days, a half-smile. Sarah described their friendship as “not just family, but Mystery Hunters.”

The cousins were both young, but they loved math, science, astronomy, zoology, and so much more! As Sarah would say, “We love learning … to the ends of the Earth … to the depths of the seas, and beyond … to the heavens.”

Sarah enjoyed climbing tall oak trees with massive limbs she described as “powerful arms holding me in place.” She loved chasing vibrant butterflies wavering in flight and hand-painting small stones to resemble ladybugs and honey bees. Sarah often left these colorful stones attached to a handwritten poem on the steps leading up to her neighbors’ homes. She was unaware everyone knew she left these precious gifts. Her neighbors loved her for her thoughtfulness and kept her sweet secret. Sarah’s family and friends knew she was a poet at heart. She thought deeply about everyone and everything.

Christian was quieter than Sarah. He struggled to make friends in school because of his shyness. But around Sarah, their families, and their two friends, ____________________ and _____________________, he was confident and happy. Christian rarely had a good night’s sleep. As he described himself, “My brain never stops, and I can’t sleep through the night. Even when I’m sleeping, my dreams keep me busy.” Christian enjoyed constructing and flying unique kites. He and his dad designed and built colorful kites shaped like spirals, triangles, stars, planets, and wheels within wheels. They made butterfly kites for Sarah.

Sarah and Christian shared their love for mystery hunts, thin-crust pepperoni pizza, kite flying, apple crisp pie, and dreaming.

Christian loved playing with his dog Ferlinghetti, a black and white sheepdog with a lazy eye. His mother named Ferlinghetti after a famous poet and painter. Ferlinghetti loved to run, and a few times, he ran away. They always found him near the small dog park, next to the Ross Family Community Park. Christian’s dad always remarked with a half-smile, “Ferlinghetti ran away to search for a new name.”

Merry Christmas, Happy Chanukah/Hanukkah, & the recognition of Kwanzaa to all our dear friends around the World!

We wish everyone a blessed holiday and a safer and healthier 2021! Christians celebrate the birth of our Lord and Savior, Christ Jesus, on December 25th. Our Jewish friends celebrated Chanukah/Hanukkah between Dec. 10th – 18th. Hanukkah commemorates the day when the Temple in Jerusalem was rededicated after Jewish warriors defeated the Greek armies. Hanukkah celebrates the triumph of light over darkness. Traditionally on each day of the eight nights, a candle is added to the menorah after sundown, and the ninth candle, known as the shamash or helper is used to light the other candles. Kwanzaa, meaning first fruits, is celebrated this year from Dec. 26th – Jan. 1st. Kwanzaa celebrates African thought, the relationship between each individual, their community and culture, and the importance of family and community.

2020 was a challenging year for our entire world! We pray for healing, safety, and the spread of kindness around the world! Please be thankful for our blessings, read to children, spend quality time with children, and encourage and uplift children. Our best wishes to all!

“A house without books is like a room without windows.” Heinrich Mann

Ed Decker, Rewireme.com, wrote the following reasons why reading to a child is so important.

1. “Reading to a child or with a child creates strong human connection. The nurturing aspect of sitting with someone while being read to provides a comforting and bonding experience that transcends mere diversion or education.

2. It establishes associations between pictures and words.  Even infants only a few months old are capable of looking at pictures and listening to a voice. Pointing at pictures and describing them contribute to the wiring process that connects images to words and helps a child recognize the importance of language.

3. It builds neural connections through repetition. Reading on a daily basis helps strengthen initially fragile connections among neurons into ones with staying power. If a child wants to hear the same book many nights in a row, hang in there. What’s boring for the storyteller may serve the child’s emotional and learning needs at the time.

4. It fosters imagination. It’s a lot easier to see yourself as a heroic character in an exotic location after meeting characters in books.

5. It helps children make sense of the world. Children’s curiosity is fueled by stories they hear, and these stories expand their vocabulary and knowledge to help them better navigate the world around them and determine how they fit into our world.”

Thank you to Ed Decker and for his insight into the importance of reading to a child.

“A house without books is like a room without windows.” Heinrich Mann

The Lost Polymath

The Mystery Hunters Series

 The Lost Polymath
Book One: Continents

Sarah and Christian both dream mysterious dreams. These dreams transport them around the corner, around the globe, and through the universe and back. They’re first cousins and best friends who plan mystery hunts every summer.

Christian’s and Sarah’s grandmother, Tata, had this same gift of prophetic dreams. She called them waking dreams because she dreamt of echoes from the future and then, suddenly, woke up.

She instructed her grandchildren to be cautious of the invisible force that would try to disrupt or stop their quests. She warned them, “This invisible force will try to frighten you, change your circumstances, alter your path, and place obstacles in your way. You were given a special gift. Use it wisely.”

Sarah and Christian were the same age. Christian resembled his dad and his Uncle Virgil, Sarah’s dad. He had dark wavy hair, deep blue-green eyes, and on most days, a half-smile. Sarah described their friendship as “not just family, but Mystery Hunters.”

The Mystery Hunters Series begins with The Lost Polymath. Sarah and Christian have mysterious dreams that provide clues to help solve each mystery on their journey, while an unseen force tries to stop them from completing their quest. This series engages the reader and a friend to become members of the team. The reader will answer 7 questions in bold. We provided two blank pages for the reader to draw themselves (in pencil) in two scenes from the book while listening to their favorite song by their favorite musical artist.

“Be Careful What You Say Around A Pregnant Woman…”

Blueberry Pi

Sciencemag.org: “Be careful what you say around a pregnant woman. As a fetus grows inside a mother’s belly, it can hear sounds from the outside world—and can understand them well enough to retain memories of them after birth, according to new research. It may seem implausible that fetuses can listen to speech within the womb, but the sound-processing parts of their brain become active in the last two trimesters of pregnancy, and sound carries fairly well through the mother’s abdomen. ‘Prenatal babies can hear the rhythm of speech, rhythm of music, and so on,’ says cognitive neuroscientist Eino Partanen of the University of Helsinki. A 1988 study suggested that newborns recognize the theme song from their mother’s favorite soap opera. More recent studies have expanded on the idea of fetal learning, indicating that newborns already familiarized themselves with sounds of their parent’s native language; one showed that American newborns seem to perceive Swedish vowel sounds as unfamiliar. Swedish infants showed the same response to English vowels.”